Sustainably sourced raw materials

At Lunawood, we are committed to buying raw materials only from well-managed forests that are harvested in a legal manner and where regeneration is ensured. We are at the frontline fighting against illegal harvesting and the over-consumption of tropical species from rain forests, since our Lunawood Thermowood products can be used as a substitute for these materials on decorative surfaces anywhere in the world.

Lunawood’s raw materials come from well-managed, sustainable Nordic forests. In Finland we cut only 75% of the annual growth and whenever one tree is cut, ten new ones are seeded. This means we are constantly binding more carbon than we are emitting.

 

 

 

PEFC-certified Nordic wood

We purchase PEFC-certified Nordic pine and spruce from certified sawmills.

Lunawood’s chain-of-custody certification provides independently verified assurance that our certified forest-based materials originate from sustainably managed forests. It complements PEFC-sustainable forest management certification, which ensures that forests are managed in line with challenging environmental, social and economic re­quirements.

Lunawood has over 30 suppliers and we are committed to sustainable growth together. Our raw material resources are located close to our mills. The average transportation distance of our raw materials is only 235 km. That saves a lot of CO2 and other non-renewable resources.

We select the best part of the log to be used in the thermal modification process. The other parts of the log are sold to other stakeholders by the sawmills. Raw materials of high quality are required for the process, and that is why every batch is quality controlled on arrival.


PEFC

PEFC is the world’s largest forest certification system. Two thirds of the world’s certified forests are certified according to PEFC requirements.
PEFC certification demonstrates that forests are managed in a sustainable way.

Sustainable forest management means ‘The stewardship and use of forests and forest lands in a way, and at a rate, that maintains their biodiversity, productivity, regeneration capacity, vitality and their potential to fulfil, now and in the future, relevant ecological, economic and social functions, at local, national, and global levels, and that does not cause damage to other ecosystems.’ As defined by Forest Europe and adopted by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). (Source: pefc.org)

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